Colibacillosis

Colibacillosis

Emaciated piglets due to colibacillosis

If colibacillosis is suspected, it is important to confirm E. coli. The distinguishing characteristic of colibacillosis is the presence of enterotoxic E. coli (ETEC) in the gut. E. coli can be cultured from faecal samples taken rectally from acute diseased, non-treated animals. The first indication is the isolation of haemolytic E. coli, of which 80% are pathogenic. Confirmation can be achieved by serotyping the isolates (determining the O-antigens) or molecular detection of typical fimbriae (for example F4, F5, F6, F18, F41), as well as enterotoxins (LT, ST) or Shiga toxin through PCR. It is also important to look for other diarrhoea-causing pathogens because often there can be a mixed infection.

Differential diagnosis for colibacilllosis:

  • Coccidiosis
  • Coronavirus infection
  • Epidemic Diarrhoea
  • Necrotic Enteritis caused by Clostridium perfringens type C
  • Rotavirus
  • Salmonella
  • Strongyloidosis
  • Transmissible Gastro Enteritis (TGE)